Tony O’Malley

Tony shadesTony joined Frank, Dyan and Paddie as Arrival's piano player when they relocated to London in 1969. After a couple of hit singles, Arrival were uncomfortable about being encouraged in a pop-oriented direction. Tony was then instrumental in pulling together the Arrival singers with the other musicians who eventually became Kokomo.

His distinctive voice and funky piano playing is a cornerstone of Kokomo's sound. He also had a spell as a member of 10cc in 1977-78, touring widely and recording the “Live and Let Live” album.

As well as his Kokomo activities, Tony fronts his own band, and regularly gigs in the UK and on the continent.

Read more on Tony's own site

Tony's upcoming gigs

Half Moon, July 2017

These two gigs were pulled together at short notice but got a good turnout nonetheless. The best news was that Jim is back, and was on top form. However, Paddie couldn’t make it, so Charlotte Churchman stood in and did a great job, and brought a number from her repertoire – Stevie Wonder’s “What’s the

Half Moon, July 2017

Rise & Shine and What’s the Fuss from the Wednesday night. More to come!

Tony’s interview on Unity Radio’s “This is Soul” show, promoting the March gigs

The interview starts about 7 minutes in and takes up pretty much the whole of the rest of the hour. Tony is interviewed by Jim Baker, and gets to choose three favourite tracks. Jim also plays some Kokomo tracks (including one from the Half Moon) and some from Tony’s band, including one hot off the

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Half Moon, October 2016

A few numbers from the first of two great nights at the Half Moon, October 2016

The Half Moon, Putney – 14-15th October 2016

By general agreement, these were the best gigs since the 2014 re-union – two sold-out nights with crowds in the weekend mood helped. For the record, Mel Collins was back on sax (“Bet you don’t get a reception like that with King Crimson” said Frank), and Andy Treacey from Faithless was on drums. Two ‘new old’ songs were in the set: “What You Waiting For” (AKA Turn Up the Microphone”), an obscure Norman Whitfield disco track originally recorded by Stargard (video from the night here), and the Quincy Jones number “Stuff Like That”.

Read Craig Chaligne’s review on Louder  Than War (he liked it).

Thanks to Steven Cropper for these great photos. Check out the rest of his work at www.transientlife.uk

 

Lonely Town, Lonely Street

From the the first of two sold-out nights at Half Moon, 14 October 2016